Refugees & the Church

Early this morning I read this article in today’s NY Times about Syrian refugees who have been settled in Michigan. After having experienced relief and being grateful for safety and some measure of security, many in this Michigan community are becoming fearful in the wake of growing anti-refugee sentiment and the reactionary rhetoric from public figures.

After our church service, we heard a powerful presentation from one of our church members who works with Bethany Christian Services to settle refugees here in West Michigan. It was exciting to hear the enthusiastic response of many in our congregation who want to get involved in providing hospitality and relief to traumatized people fleeing war-torn places.

The Hospitality of Abraham

It’s difficult for anyone to ignore the present international refugee crisis. Because I’m in the midst of studying Mark’s Gospel, I’ve been processing what I’m hearing through the lenses of the cross, commands to provide hospitality to the socially ostracized and marginalized, and Jesus’ teaching on service. I’m also nearly finished with John Barclay’s marvelous book, Paul & the Gift, which offers a compelling vision of the church as a social body that instantiates the incongruous grace of God. Because God’s grace is given without regard to worth–to the “ungodly”–the church always must struggle to identify its antipathies to those it deems “ungodly” or “unworthy” of God’s kindness and embrace others, even (especially!) those it considers threatening.

Because these are such pervasive themes in Scripture and since the implications of the cross are so extensive with regard to this pressing contemporary issue, I may roll out some thoughts over the next few weeks regarding biblical resources for Christian thinking about refugees. This crisis presents a wonderful opportunity for Christians to think and speak from their fundamental identity as Christians, rather than from earthly loyalties.

The icon above, by the way, is “The Hospitality of Abraham.” “Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it” (Heb. 13:2).

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2 responses to “Refugees & the Church

  • Admin

    Well said, Tim. Here in Australia there has been intense debate about our asylum seeker policy.

    I think Paul’s vision of the church in Rom 12:9–21 is helpful. In v. 13 he exhorts the church to practise hospitality (philoxenia), and at the end of the chapter he urges Jesus-followers to overcome evil with good, which is an expression of Christian love, I think.

    This is a missional church, isn’t it?

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