Monday after The Masters

There are few sporting events like The Masters and there’s nothing like the final round on Sunday for unpredictability and drama.

The big story is Bubba Watson’s victory.  His swing is homemade and he’s a “feel” player, the type of golfer for which The Masters is perfect. 

Bubba wears his emotions on his sleeve and is a genuinely good guy, so it was fun to see him win.

Masters final rounds inevitably involve tragedy on a grand scale, and it was tough to see Phil Mickelson make triple bogey after a solid start.

Tiger Woods seemed completely lost the entire week.  Having won two weeks ago in convincing fasion, he seemed poised to do well.  His self-evaluation afterwards indicates, I think, that he’s in the same mental wilderness as other great champions who have “lost it.” 

As I wrote previously, athletes are often the last people to assess their performances honestly.  How much more difficult is that for Woods, having been raised by a father who regularly made messianic predictions of his son?


2 responses to “Monday after The Masters

  • Adam

    Because I know you’ve written insightfully about this in the past, I’d be interested to hear your throught on the Christian embrace of Bubba Watson (a la Tim Tebow/Jeremy Lin). He and his wife are certainly not shy about their faith (Jim Nance was even like, we know it means a ton “for you” to win on Easter). Yet, I feel strangely more comfortable with Bubba’s non-shyness than with Tebow’s. Does that make me a bad person, haha?

    • timgombis

      The interview with Nance was interesting because he seemed overwhelmed by the emotion of the moment, too (Nance, I mean). And that’s striking because he’s good friends with Mickelson and has been close with Couples since college. He wasn’t as moved when those guys won–though he certainly was, if you remember those interviews–so it was odd that he was so struck by Watson. I took Nance’s comment to refer to their adoption of a child, not so much winning on Easter, though that may be what he meant.

      I think I know what you mean about Watson’s carrying his Christian identity viz. Tebow. There’s probably lots to say about all of that, but certainly Watson doesn’t seek to exploit opportunities as much as Tebow.

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